Practical Exercises For Slow Aging?

There are many easy work outs can contribute to slow aging if they are done regularly. Jumping rope is one of them. When you jump rope a few minutes per day, you’ll reap all of these life improving rewards.

There are many easy work outs can contribute to slow aging if they are done regularly. Jumping rope is one of them.  When you jump rope a few minutes per day, you’ll reap all of these life improving rewards.
  • Boost your metabolism
  • Burn more fat than typical cardio
  • Strengthen legs, glutes, calves
  • Improve brain & heart function
  • Slow down the aging process

MASTERY TAKES PRACTICE – If you haven’t mastered jump rope basics yet, don’t worry. Practice is the key to getting better & reaping more of the benefits. Anyone that you see is good at it, has put in the work.

So if you want to increase longevity and slow your body’s aging, start also by targeting these four areas of physical fitness.

  1. Lean muscle mass

Do some form of strength training, such as lifting weights or practicing a strength-based yoga routine.

  1. Leg strength

When doing your strength training, don’t skip leg exercises.

  1. Cardiorespiratory endurance

Get your heart rate elevated for a sustained period of time by running, cycling, swimming, rowing or walking briskly.

  1. Physical mobility and flexibility

Regularly move your joints through their full range of motion, both while exercising and during everyday activities. Stretch and perform self-massage to encourage additional flexibility.

Exercises like these actually decrease your so-called “fitness age”, which is a better predictor of longevity than your chronological age. So if you are fifty years old but have a fitness age of thirty, you’d be expected to live longer than another fifty-year-old with a fitness age of seventy.

On a cautionary note, extreme endurance exercise can lead to potentially fatal heart damage. It can also compromise your lean muscle mass, leg strength and mobility, thus affecting your longevity.

In this context, “extreme endurance exercise” means regularly training for and competing in events such as marathons, ultramarathons, ironman distance triathlons, and very long distance bicycle or cross-country skiing races.

In other words, regularly logging 100 miles of running or 200 miles of cycling every week can lead to heart problems and an early death.

Given the evidence, the best approach for longevity seems to be balancing strength, endurance and mobility training. It is quite possible to achieve the levels of physical fitness associated with longevity without extreme endurance exercise (and in the cases of lean muscle mass, leg strength and flexibility, abstaining from extreme endurance exercise is a necessity).

To test how your exercise routine is likely to affect your longevity, measure your lean muscle mass, leg strength, cardiorespiratory endurance and mobility over time and modify your program to optimize your results.

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